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that because we love gridlock in washington as the republicans right? so he said, if the senate reforms it, the filibuster, we'll block every vote. quote, any bill that reaches the republican-led house based on the senate democrat's heavy handed power play would be dead on arrival. if you thought gridlock was bad before, wait until you get a load of the new gridlock where he would kill every single bill. do you remember what president obama said before the election? i'll remind you don't worry here it comes. my hope, my expectation is that after the election, now that it turns out that the goal beating obama does not make much sense because i'm not running again that we can start getting some cooperation again. hate to do it to you but wrong again, bob. it doesn't look like you're going to get a lot of cooperation. but then the radical wing of the republican party said no the republicans are being too soft and boehner is being too light on the president. his grand bargain proposal the republican counter offer to the extent that it can be interpreted from the hazy details now available is a
distinguished career in congress advocating on behalf of those voices who were often drowned out in washington by the influence of the moneyed interest. over the last 40 years, congressman stark has been one of the foremost advocates on behalf on efforts to ensure that americans were able to access quality, affordable health insurance. i am honored to have been one of the three principaled co- authors in the house of the historic affordable care act which will provide quality insurance for every single american. the key role mr. stark in drafting that law and made sure that the law provided needed relief for working families. this was a crucial accomplishment, yet it was far from mr. stark's only accomplishment in the field of health care. as a former chair and ranking democrat on the ways and means health subcommittee for many years, he was a leader on the health care reform. he was a lead author of the original cobra insurance bill which ensured that workers faced with losing their jobs would not also immediately lose access to the needed health insurance. and those of us who have gone throu
understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a backgrou
, a reporter described where we are right now as a situation of washington post own making. -- washington's own making. how did we get where we are right now? >> on the revenue side, you go back to the bush years. when they passed the bush tax cuts, for various procedural reasons, they wanted to shoehorn as much tax-cutting as they could into a 10-year period. because of the rules, they really went overboard, did much more in the way of tax cutting and we could afford. it was very apparent at the time that they did it. they sun-setted it all after 10 years. the same is true with the so- called sequester. across-the-board cuts of $1.20 trillion, focused on domestic spending, was put in place to try to provide leverage to the special committee that if it did not reach agreement, the sequester would drop and do something that nobody favors, an across-the-board cut. no distinctions, no prioritize nation. just to cut across the board. -- prioritization. just to cut across the board. >> going back to the bush years, what is congress's role in this? >> i vigorously and energetically opposed it. i said
negotiations between capitol hill and the white house. from today's washington journal, this is about an hour. fiscal cliff. joining us here is stan collender and douglas holtz- eaken. what is happening? what are the two talking about. guest: the nature of the tax increases, how much, and on the other side, what kind of entitlement reforms as the president willing to offer? that has been going back and forth for quite awhile now. there are talking about the same basic issues. host: one of the shore signs of action in washington, we have heard there is a possibility that they could come back after christmas. guest: i have been telling clients since september we were going over the cliff. i was not sure there was a sign it or coming back before christmas. this last-minute deal of some time, it could easily be approved -- the house and senate do not need to be here for this because it will not be the big, big deal. this is not the grand compromise they are talking about here there is not enough support to do the technical things. this could be a simple package they do at the last minute. host: e
to go up. but we only run the house. democrats continue to run washington. >> call me a hopeless optimist, but i actually still think we can get it done. >> eamon javers live in washington. eamon, fascinating to look at that tape in retrospect. >> i think a lot of people in washington think the make-or-break deal making sessions have already happened here. and one republican senator i talked to this morning said there are very low expectations now for this meeting at the white house today. and boy, how times have changed, carl. just watching that tape that you just ran. one of the things that i'll be watching for when i'm standing on the white house north lawn this afternoon is whether or not these four congressional leaders come out as they did back in november and talk to the press after the meeting. we've had a lot of meetings at the white house where people have left very quickly, gotten into a suv and driven off the complex without talking to reporters. if they come out to those microphones after this meeting and come out together, i think that will be a hopeful sign that pe
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
companies and some countries. >> do you plan to stay in washington? >> it depends on what kind of business i can acquire. i have a beautiful wife and i want to spend more time with him and get my golf handicap down to single digits. >> have you thought about the preservation of your papers? what will you do with all that? >> i am sending most of it to indiana university. especially the autism information. i have -- the indiana historical society will get some of my papers. i hope they find a good use for them. >> when you look back over 31 years which went by very quickly, what were the best years? >> oh, gosh, there was good in all of them. the best years from my standpoint was when i was chairman. even the people who work for me said, we felt like we were accomplishing something. we were fighting the good fight. that is one of the things i hold most dear. we were able to put on the gloves, grabbed the sword, and fight for the things we thought was right. >> thank you for spending time with this reflecting back on your ears in washington. -- years in washington. >> we are asking business ow
. and preparation now of weapons like sarin gas. more on that coming up in just a bit. >>> also from washington right now, fox news has confirmed that the fbi is today investigating who hacked into the computers of our retired admiral mike mullen and read his e-mails. this guy's the former chairman of the joint chiefs. and they're in his personal computer. the bureau discovered that someone had read the e-mails of the former chairman of the joint chiefs back in october of this year, and we are told that all the clues point to someone in china. john lucas is an internet security expert and the international president of high-tech crime experts. did i get your last anytime right? >> close. megyn: thanks for the clarification. now, he's on his personal computer, but he's on government sort of property doing work for the government on his personal computer, and he's talking to people who still have all the clearances and so on, and why do we believe it was the chinese? >> well, what happens is when the fbi or anybody gets involved and started tracking this back, we're going to trace the ip addresse
report" start ises right now. >>> the big news tonight, still the developments in washington on the fiscal cliff, eamon javers joins us with the details. >> good evening, meshel. capitol hill sources tell cnbc that congressional leaders are planning to go to the white house tomorrow to meet with president barack obama and it is not entirely clear at this point when that meeting will take place and details are still being hammered out and we saw today a blistering series of rhetorical jabs from one side to the other and it's not clear as a result of all that whether a deal can, in fact, get hammered out in the remaining time before new year's eve and take a listen to senate republican leader mitch mcconnell earlier today explaining the problems he's facing in washington. take a listen. >> the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> we do know t
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
commentator once observed the political culture in washington. some men seek power and influence in order to be somebody. real men seek power and influence in order to be a blessing. i am blessed to welcome him to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever
be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against france being against us. it got ugly with the un. people were saying we don't eat french fries and french wine. we have freedom fries. that lasted about a week. i was mad with the maker. he put me in an awkward position. we exchanged views about it. he was an adversary. i couldn't let him become an enemy because i meet him later. turn him into a friend at some point. that's what he did with me. i don't like to accumulate enemies for that. i rather have people i disagree with and if we can work it out, i have an adversary and a friend. >> you talked about anger. you are flown anger as are a lot of great leaders and you learn how to control about it and you say it's so important for somebody that's running an office or a
, washington, d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. there's almost nothing about human rights. this sends a terrible signal to the iranian public. it means that you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear-armed state but what happens in iran does not really matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and the initiative to make the human rights issues more important sends the right signal to the iranian public, telling them that you do understand that the government which is restricting its own population can also not be trusted when it comes to its international aspirations. imagine how it would be paid to behave. concerning the role about the revolutionary guards, it has inherited the religious state, something that was discussed by the previous panel. when the ayatollah khomeini was making press -- promises to the iranian people and 1960's and 1970's, he promised the people of iraq and not democracy. he promised them justice in this world
earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in early january this is the way washington works, they walk right up to the edge of the deal, maybe even past the edge of the deal and then something happens. i still think the market believes there will be a deal, but it is a deal that might happen on january 14th. so, i don't think december 31st is a real deadline, in the mark it's mind. >> steve, tell us, what are the things that can happen that will sort of rouse the market here, move the market up or down ire way? >> well, first of all, i think the tendency for the market right now is to go higher because you have zero interest rates and zero interest rates act as a tremendous stock market flotation device. opposing investments are, you know, yielding essentially nothing at this point, so stocks become very attractive. but i still think the big story and the stories that most traders will be watching is the fiscal cliff so that's story number one. an interesting thing happened yesterday and that's the price of oil traded to an all-time high going back to october, not an a
to be in charge the coverage was there. i am not sure a lot of that registered in washington intelligence community where we had a different sense of the soviet leadership we were acquiring as we went through the dialogue it became difficult to look what we were getting from the intelligence side and what we received across the table but in geneva as president reagan met gorbachev the first time the two of them met in front of a fireplace conversation later walking along the lake and began to see the emergence where people accept and believe in president reagan's view of the role of nuclear weapons, very real distasteful. the key documents that emerged from geneva besides agreements later, the key document, the joint statement at the beginning, two leaders agree nuclear war can never be won and must never be fought. there were negotiations going on at the time, negotiations going on in geneva but they began to take their lead from the summit discussions. we were not able easily to get to the washington summit. kept running into bilateral issues in which one of our correspondents was picke
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ >>> huge protests taking place at michigan state house. there's a vote from the house that has passed the right to work bill. want to bring in alison kosik for the latest. this is controversial, allison. how are people responding? >> reporter: there's not much response here. what's going on inside the ca
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us today, receive renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we ask for y
on the line every day in distant lands have to worry about whether those who in washington can effectively support them. we are down to the wire now. in these next few days, congress needs to make the right decision and to avoid the fiscal disaster that awaits us. my hope is that they will do the right thing and that we will achieve a bipartisan consensus on deficit reduction and the trajectory of defense spending in the future. otherwise, we will weaken this nation in the minds of our allies, our partners, and our potential adversaries, and undermined the work as a sacrifices that our troops are making every single day. it's easy to get cynical and frustrated in this town. and after 40 years, i know my level of cynicism and frustration. but my confidence and my hope for the future is restored every time i have the opportunity to visit with our troops on the front lines, as i did last week. in them, i see the spirit of public service that has kept this country strong for more than two centuries and which has helped us to overcome every period of crisis and adversity in our history. that sp
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
to leave for washington tonight. congress expected to return on thursday. president, guys, not expected to actually arrive in washington until tomorrow morning. no talks scheduled that we know of as of yet. all the attention's going to turn to the senate, which tends to be more of a compromising body than the house is. >> yes. and the president is available in person if you should want to go over there and visit with him. or perhaps if he wants to visit with anybody else. the consensus seems to be if you get some sort of a deal, it's obviously not going to be the big deal. it will simply be something that extends the tax cuts for the vast majority of americans, at least those earning less than $250,000 a year. the consensus seems to be, carl, that if we don't get a deal by the second or third or fourth week, the super bowl week, we'll start to feel it in the economy. >> we had a notable sell-off. there is typically a bias on christmas eve, but the worst christmas eve performance for the dow since 2006 because of the jitters about the fiscal cliff. it will be an interesting few days as c
in putting china's legal system on the political map in washington. when i started long ago to study about china's legal system, most people who would charitable felt sorry for me. they felt i must be having a nervous breakdown -- [laughter] to throw away a career in the law on a country we could not visit and seven years after the korean war's ended, we had bad relations. american views about "red china" were very negative. i wanted to have the help of the scientific you see in analyzing the rule of law in china. i remember 1964 or 1965 in lake tahoe and comparing the soviet and chinese legal systems. i was asked to talk about law. i talked about law, courts, judges. the political scientists could not have been less interested. i was disappointed. the next day talking with the conference organizers, i made another attempt. i never mentioned law. i talked about institutions and sanctions and use all the jargon of political science. they all said, that is really fundamental. [laughter] i discovered a little bit about how to be persuasive in the world.al million -- as cheng li's recognizes i
a wonderful monday. i'm brook baldwin at the cnn headquarters in atlanta. let's go to washington with wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins right now. >>> brook, thanks very much. happening now, the president of the united states steps into a very intense political fight in michigan and he's definitely taking sides. we're also looking into what's behind the dramatically lower prices showing up at gas stations near you. and life-saving television. we have an amazing look at an underground tv channel run by rebel fighters in one of the most dangerous cities in the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama getting into a new fight with republicans and it's a fight he may actually lose. this afternoon in detroit, the president blasted a package of anti-union bills. michigan republicans, governor, is ush pushing through his state's legislature. >> what we shouldn't do, i just got to say this, what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. >> even though the cheering went on fo
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
william burns is scheduled to meet tuesday in washington. >>> a search for active earthquake faults near japan's nuclear power plant may lead to the scrapping of one of them. implications run deep. >> reporter: 17 commercial nuclear plants and one major test reactor have been built in japan. the nuclear regulation authority was formed after last year's disaster to monitor their safety. experts at the authority are trying to determine if any of the reactors lie above active fault lines. the tsuruga plant in central japan has been known to have an active fault running close by. the fault is called urasoko. another fault intersects with it. it runs right under the facility's number two reactor. a team of experts dug up the ground at the plant so they could inspect the fault directly. the government panel examined the results of the so-called trade survey. panel members said on monday that the d-1 fault is probably active. they said that layers of earth near the fault have become deformed. the deformation is believed to cause d-1 to become active when national guidelines ban the building of
. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his offices are pictures of washington and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark o
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
press club here in washington today. he will talk about election shun reform. c-span will have it live beginning at 1:00 eastern. at 7:00 eastern c-span will be live with a discussion on skilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is talking about a bill that will allow more highly killed immigrants into the united states. it will be hosted by the university of virginia. >>> we've had explosions of knowledge in medicine but we've not coordinated care. all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating and you got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all, i mean on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? and of course now we've got the institute of medicine report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care, when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures? this is something i think which is for the first time, really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on
the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it done. but it is wonderful to be back. it is good to see everybody in the great state of michigan. [appl
people and get beyond their pledge to a special interest lobbyist here in washington, d.c. although, frankly, i fail to see how avoiding to cut taxes violates the pledge to never raise taxes. we need to defeat the previous question. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i'd like to remind the gentleman that the republicans have already passed the bill for the middle class tax cut on august 1 of this year and passed 256-171. we are now waiting for the senate to act on that. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves his time. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, the vice chairman of the democrat caucus, mr. becerra. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. becerra: i thank the gentlelady for yielding. if you're in the middle class, shouldn't it feel like you're in the middle of america? yet the politics of extremism is pushing the middle class to the very edge. the
challenged the members of our party to grapple with these issues, make tough choices. washington has a serious spending problem. this was the year, the size of our debt, all $16 trillionths of it, surpass the size of our retientire economy. but president's solution of raising tax rates would hurt jobs, at a time when for too many of our citizens are struggling to find them. i have seen the damage that higher taxes can do for jobs and families. i do not want tax rates to go up. republicans do not want tax rates to go up. the best way to address are crippling debt is to make significant spending cuts and fix our tax code, to pave the way for long-term growth and opportunity. this is an approach that most americans approve. we only run the house. democrats continued to run washington. hope springs eternal. we have it in us to come together and do the right thing. will continue to work with our colleagues in congress and the white house on a plan that protects families and small businesses. for now, i wish all the american people a blessed and mary christmas. >> on "newsmakers," represen
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather t
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
. meanwhile, investors are keeping an eye on washington as the deadline to avert the so-called fiscal cliff comes ever closer. >> a different kind of click now -- thousands of mystics, new-age and deals and fans of pre- hispanic culture made their way to mexico in hopes of witnessing great things in less than 24 hours now. that is when the old mayan calendar predicts the end of the current world and the dawn of a new one. >> many of today's ethnic maya do not understand what all the fuss is about. mostly christian, they have looked on in wonder at the influx of foreign tourists to ancient cities in southern mexico and central america was a past hundreds of years ago. -- whose heyday past hundreds of years ago. >> they are dancing according to an ancient mayan ritual in preparation for the end of the world. these days, the famous complex in guatemala is full of visitors. many tourists have come to experience the big day. >> there are mixed feelings. some believe the world is going to end. others believe it is the end of one era and the beginning of another. democrats are also gathering at ma
washington post." dr. ashton carter, deputy secretary of defense. allyson fitzgerald, a freelance journalist and the chairwoman of the speaker's committee. i'm going to speak this -- skip the speaker for a minute. adana, reporter for usa today and past president of the national press club and speakers' committee organized today's luncheon. dr. jim miller, undersecretary of the defense policy. larry moffey editing manager army magazine. john, past president of the national press club and former commander of american legion post number 20 at the national press club. joe, incoming editor-in-chief, aviation week and past chairman of the national press club board of governors. paul schenck minn, national security reporter, u.s. news and world report. [applause] just 18 months ago our guest today leon panetta presented as the cia director over the one of daring operations in the country's history. the operation spier their lead on osama bin laden secret compound in pakistan. three days ago defense secretary leon panetta landed in turkey where he signed an order that was then patriot missile battle
hope. dr. richard besser, abc news, washington. >> fantastic news. and it's a light drug, called azd 6765. >> remember that. >> memorize it, everybody. >> sometimes these antidepressants take weeks to kick in. if you're depressed, you have to imagine the suicide potential is high. so the weeks it takes to kick in, you know, that's important. that's a lag time where bad stuff could happen. so this is encouraging news for a lot of people who suffer with this. >> a lot of people wait until it's too late. so this could be great. >> certainly good news. we will lighten the mood when we come back. keep it right here on "world news now." ♪ >>> it's no secret that we like to eat around here. particularly one of us. so this next story is one that we're a little perplexed by. >> you like to eat. i actually like to inhale my food because i eat it so quick. but it's a growing trend that lets people inhale their food in a good way. >> reporter: attention foodies. put down your forks. >> i know that taste. >> reporter: the latest culinary craze doesn't involve food at all. >> for me, it's like g
. while those back to washington d.c. the testify in court? is just not doable. i think that he is quite right that within the unique concepts -- context of guantanamo bay where we half for a handful of detainees left and have engaged essentially in a war of choice, although with respect to the war on terror, more broadly and obviously we have to fight back against terrorism in some capacity. the underlying nature of the detention authority is not that these people being held for crimes. there being held prevented league as a matter of preventive detention to ensure they don't get back on the field and have an opportunity to kill our soldiers. the question becomes, when you take their reasonableness of the d.c. circuit's handling of the responsibilities of the supreme court with respect to this relatively small population, there's no question, the united states, given all of our wealth of resources can handle habeas cases dealing with a few hundred detainees data guantanamo bay. were up putting more people there because we don't want to have to do with the burdens of doing it but we can
trees were lit in washington, d.c. president obama and the first family participated in the 90th annual christmas tree lighting ceremony. the tradition of a national christmas tree started in 1923 with president coolidge. house speaker john boehner joins the lighting of the capitol christmas tree. this year's tree is from the colorado's white river national forest. watch both of these ceremonies tonight 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page sense of writing. but i think that there's no tha other art form so readily available other than perhaps -- inaudible just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend join book tv american history tv and c-span's local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city albany. today at noon eastern on book tv on c-span and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> next government officials and policy researchers testify about the political instability in malli. earlier in the year, malli experienced a military coup and norther
," which is a classic of washington, i think, no one should go to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
in washington, d.c. however, the proximity of the south caucasus to iran as well as strong relationship with armenia, azerbaijan and georgia. have with both of the united states and israel, it increases the appeal of the iranians for targeting those countries. i applaud those governments in the region for the vigilance against the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the
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